Sermon: “Jesus Christ and Him Crucified” (1 Corinthians 1:26–2:5)

by Feb 24, 2019Sermons0 comments

If the gospel seems to be folly and weakness according to the world’s standards, then how can anyone possibly believe? This is the question that Paul takes up in 1 Corinthians 1:26–2:5. First, Paul answer by insisting that God calls those whom he chooses to salvation, although Paul insists that God’s choice has nothing to do with any personal merit in those whom God chooses (1 Cor. 1:26–29). On the contrary, God’s choice humiliates the wise and the strong so that no one may boast before the Lord. Second, Paul redirects any boasting we might do on our own behalf toward boasting instead in the person of Christ Jesus—our wisdom from God, righteousness and sanctification, and redemption (1 Cor. 1:30–31). Finally, Paul identifies the process by which sinners come to faith: through the human weakness of preaching and the divine power of the Holy Spirit (1 Cor. 2:1–5).

By each of these logical steps, Paul rejects any inclination of our hearts toward thinking that we may be saved because of who we are or what we do. Instead, all the glory in our salvation goes to God for his great wisdom, power, and love toward sinners. Even though we did not deserve it, God sent his Son to die for us on the cross. Then, even though we were entirely blind to the message of God’s salvation, God sent his Holy Spirit to open our eyes to see the glory of Christ crucified through the least humanly plausible method possible: preaching. In all of this, from first to last, God teaches us to glory and boast in Christ crucified alone. Thus, the message of 1 Corinthians 1:26–2:5 is that God calls his people to boast in Christ by the power of the Holy Spirit.

26 For consider your calling, brothers: not many of you were wise according to worldly standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth. 27 But God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong; 28 God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are, 29 so that no human being might boast in the presence of God. 30 And because of him you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, righteousness and sanctification and redemption, 31 so that, as it is written, “Let the one who boasts, boast in the Lord.”

2 And I, when I came to you, brothers, did not come proclaiming to you the testimony of God with lofty speech or wisdom. 2 For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. 3 And I was with you in weakness and in fear and much trembling, 4 and my speech and my message were not in plausible words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, 5 so that your faith might not rest in the wisdom of men but in the power of God.1 Corinthians 1:26-2:5, ESV

As many of you know, before I was called to serve as pastor at Harvest, I worked for a start-up tech company. What was really fun is that I got involved with the company right after they launched. So, I got to have a role in helping to get this business off the ground.

What that involved was two things. Number one, we worked so hard to tweak and improve the product that we offered. We were constantly reframing it, reorganizing it, repackaging it; we were working from our core competencies. We were trying to figure out the best way to offer what we did in a way that would be helpful and valuable for our clients.

The other thing that we were doing, we were constantly tweaking the pitch that we were making. I read a book on cold calling to figure out how to make our cold calls better. We spent weeks and months trying to hone the perfect script and how to get just a few more people to agree for a meeting when we called them. In that initial exploratory meeting, we spend tons of time and effort trying to figure out the best way to get that meeting to convert into a formal sales pitch.

Then when we were in a formal sales pitch, we spent gobs of time trying to figure out the most effective way to pitch what we were doing in a way that would end with our eventual goal, a signed contract. We spent tons of time tweaking the product and pitch. Without doing that the business would not still be around. Only because we were willing to go to that great length is the business thriving to this day. They are still doing both of those things.

I mention all of that to compare the way in which a business launches and it is so hard to make a dollar. It is so hard to get a business off the ground. Then I’m going to compare that to the way that Christianity spreads. The way that the church launched into the world, through the original preaching of the gospel by the apostles, including the apostle Paul whose letter we are reading in 1 Corinthians. I hold up both of these models, the business model and the church model, not to show the ways in which they are similar. But rather to show that they are diametrically different ways of pursuing spreading the gospel of Jesus as compared to running a business.

In the church, we are not so much given a product to pitch as a message. Our message in the eyes of the world, according to human understand and human wisdom, is a lemon. We are called to proclaim that a victim of Roman execution by crucifixion is in fact the power of God unto salvation. We dare not tweak or improve upon that message. Furthermore, we are not allowed to improve upon the pitch. We are not allowed to use the most effective tactics in convincing and manipulating people. We are not just trying to sell a product; we are proclaiming Jesus Christ and him crucified.

If we can’t affect the message and the method by which we proclaim the gospel of Jesus. Then how can we expect anyone ever to come to believe the gospel? Again, if the company that I worked for wasn’t willing to do whatever we could to improve our product and pitch, that company never would have survived. How then will the church survive? How then has the church survived over the ages?

Our big idea today is God calls his people to boast in Christ by the power of the Holy Spirit.

The answer is not what we do, but what God does in calling his people to boast in Christ by the power of the Holy Spirit. We will see that in three ways today.

  1. Our Calling as the People of God
  2. Our Boast in the Person of Christ
  3. Our Preaching by the Power of the Holy Spirit

Our Calling as the People of God

Our calling is as the people of God. Look at 1 Corinthians 1:26-29 to get us started this morning.

26 For consider your calling, brothers: not many of you were wise according to worldly standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth. 27 But God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong; 28 God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are, 29 so that no human being might boast in the presence of God. 1 Corinthians 1:26-29, ESV

When Paul talks about calling, he’s not talking about a vocation. He’s not talking about something we feel called to do in this life. He’s not talking about our career, family, or something we feel passionate about. He’s talking about God’s call to call sinners to salvation through faith in Jesus Christ. Really, he’s not talking so much about the general call that God makes to all people everywhere by his wisdom. By the fact that you are listening to this message right now, you are hearing God’s call to you to repent from your sins and believe upon the Lord Jesus Christ with the promise that whoever calls upon the name of the Lord Jesus Christ will be saved. That’s not even the calling that Paul has in mind here.

The specific calling that Paul has in mind here is what theologians call the effectual call. We’ve talked about this the last couple of weeks, because this word “calling” has come up several times so far. We saw it in verse one, that Paul was called to be an apostle. Verse two, the church at Corinth were called to be saints. Verse nine, God who is faithful called the Corinthian church into the fellowship of his son, Jesus Christ our Lord. In verse twenty-four, that to those who are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ is the power of God and the wisdom of God.

Now Paul says consider this calling. What is this effectual call? It is the work of the Holy Spirit to open the eyes of the blind and to soften that hearts that are hard so that men, women and children may recognize the goodness and the truth and the beauty of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Without this work of the Holy Spirit I could preach to you all day, you could read from the text of scripture all day long, but the general call would just wash over you. You would be blind to what it holds out to you in Christ. Your heart would be hardened so that you would not believe in it.

And it’s by this work that God, by his Spirit, causes human beings to believe in the Lord Jesus Christ unto salvation. So, the reason that Paul brings up this effectual calling here is to point out the reasons that were not behind God’s effectual calling that went out. In other words, the reasons that didn’t stand behind God’s motivation to call people into his church.

He said the reason that God called you had nothing to do with who you were. He says in verse twenty-six,

26 For consider your calling, brothers: not many of you were wise according to worldly standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth. 1 Corinthians 1:26, ESV

In other words, God didn’t look out in the world and pick out the wisest and most powerful or the best connected in the world. He didn’t looked at them and say, “I want those people to be on my dream team.” That’s not the way it worked.

Then how does it work? Why does God call those whom he calls? This is what Paul goes on to talk about in verse twenty-seven and twenty-eight, to emphasize that God’s calling has to do with God’s sovereign choice of people.

27 But God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong; 28 God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are,
1 Corinthians 1:27-28, ESV

In verse twenty-seven and twenty-eight he says three times “God chose”. He tells us exactly why. First he tells us is the effect of God’s choice. He says in verse twenty-seven that God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise. God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong. The sense of shaming, this humiliation, is the idea that this humiliation is an ongoing. It happened originally when Paul wrote this letter to the church in Corinth and its continuing in a sense all the way to this day. As long as God raises up a people for his own possession in the church, that for all that time God will be humiliating the wise and the powerful and the strong in this world.

But in verse twenty-eight Paul is looking forward to the future. It’s not just something that’s happening now, it’s something that will happen decisively in the future. Look at verse twenty-eight. This idea of bringing to nothing is a word that Paul uses to talk about the final judgment that God will bring about when the Lord Jesus Christ returns. You may remember in verse eight Paul wrote about the day of our Lord Jesus Christ, the day of darkness and gloom, is what the day of the Lord is talked about in the Old Testament. The day when God comes as the righteous judge to judge the world.

On that day, Paul is saying in verse twenty-eight, he will bring to nothing those who take confidence in their own strength. That’s the effect of what God is doing by choosing and then by calling those whom he chooses.

But in verse twenty-nine we get the purpose, why God doing this, why it has got to order it this way. This is what we see in verse twenty-nine, so that no human being might boast in the presence of God. Now this idea of boasting can carry the idea of bragging or of claiming credit. But as Gordon Fee points out his commentary, this idea of boasting can be something a little bit simpler; what one trusts in or to put one’s full confidence in something. In other words, it expresses where your hope is, where your confidence is. Paul says that no human being should have confidence, should boast, in themselves in the presence of God. God’s whole purpose for choosing and calling a specific group of people is that so no human being might boast in the presence of God.

So, the application that we draw from this first section looks like this. Very simply, do not boast in yourself. Now there’s bad news and there’s good news about this. Do not boast in yourself because here’s the bad news, God condemns any sense of personal merit that we put our confidence in.

Ask yourself this; do you think God would save you because of your intelligence? Do you think God would save you because of some kind of power or strength or giftedness you have, or the relationships that you have? Do you think God needs you to spread his message to your vast connected groups of people? Your financial power, you are abilities and talents? Children, do you think that God intends to save you because you were born into a Christian family?

Understand that God will not save you because of anything that you have. God will not save you because of anything that you can bring to the table. In other words, Paul is not selling a luxury product to the elite. That’s not what he’s doing here. You can’t be saved because of you and as long as you take confidence in the things that you offer, you are still far from the kingdom of God. Unless you repent you will be brought to nothing on the day of judgment.

That’s the bad news, but there’s good news here. That God effectually calls sinners to saving faith in Jesus Christ by the power of his Holy Spirit in spite of any good thing on our part. So, what this means is that if the world does not think you are something, if the world’s opinion of you is not very high, that’s okay. Has the world cast you?

You’re not saved by mistreatments, but these mistreatments equip you with a special ability to see through this world. To see it for what it is. It’s sort of like infrared goggles that enable you to see into the darkness of this world to see what’s actually there. That this world is not for you. What the world has intended for evil in casting you aside, God has intended for good. To equip you to recognize that you have no hope except in Christ.

God will save all those who call on the name of the Lord Jesus Christ whether you’re smart or not, whether you’re powerful or not, whether you’re well born or not, for whoever calls on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ will be saved. That’s the nature of our calling as the people of God.

Our Boast in the Person of Christ

The next question we have to ask is, why is this calling good? Why should we want what God has called us to? The answer that Paul gives us in verses thirty and thirty-one is that we boast in the person of Christ. So, the second section in this last two verses in chapter one is that our boast is in the person of Christ.

Now this is a remarkable verse, verse thirty as a remarkable verse because it packs in so much remarkable glory of Jesus it just a few words.

30 And because of him you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, righteousness and sanctification and redemption, 31 so that, as it is written, “Let the one who boasts, boast in the Lord.”
1 Corinthians 1:30-31, ESV

We read, “because of him”, because of God or from God in other words God is the origin of this God is the source of this, he is the one initiating this. Now the phrase “in Christ Jesus” what Paul is talking about is our union and communion that we have in Christ through faith. It means that we are incorporated into him. That what is his is ours and what ours is he belongs to him.

So, what Paul tells us that what we have in Christ Jesus is first that in Christ Jesus who became to us the wisdom from God. I wish I could preach a whole sermon on this, but this idea has behind it that Christ is the foundation and the focal point of the eternal counsel of God.

I’ve been reading John Owens book, “The Person of Christ”. John Owen was a puritan who lived in the 1600s. He has this remarkable section in his book on the person of Christ. On how Christ is the foundation and the focal point of the eternal counsel of God. All that God had planned to do, all that God intended to do, began with Christ and ended with Christ. And that in that Christ, when we look upon the person, we are seeing in front of us all of the riches of God’s greatest planning, of God’s greatest wisdom, is held out Christ and him crucified.

Now we gained this wisdom in Christ by being captivated by and recognizing it for what it is, but also, we gained this wisdom for ourselves. Look ahead a little bit to 1 Corinthians 2:16 wherePaul says,

16 “For who has understood the mind of the Lord so as to instruct him?” But we have the mind of Christ.1 Corinthians 2:16, ESV

We gain the mind of Christ through faith in Christ hope. Paul goes on from there, he says not only that Christ Jesus has become wisdom from God, he’s also the righteousness.

This word righteousness has in mind the courtroom where God, the righteous judge of all the earth, is demanding that we give an account for our lives. Somehow, even though we’re sinners, somehow at the end of the day God declares us righteous, not guilty. Satan rises to object. The great accuser of the brethren, the prosecuting attorney, points to all that we have done.

But God, the judge of all the earth simply points to the Lord Jesus Christ and says do you not know that this child is in Christ Jesus? His sins were given to Christ Jesus and my son was put to death for those sins. What was this child’s now belongs to Jesus and Jesus has dealt with it once it for all at the cross. Not only that, but because this child is in Christ Jesus, he or she has received righteousness from Christ. So, this person is not guilty and is fully righteous before me.

In Christ we have righteousness. Not only righteousness though, a third word that Paul uses is sanctification, in other words holiness. We are made holy. We are set apart as holy to the Lord. Not because of our holiness, we are unclean, diluted, defiled sinners. However, because of Christ’s holiness. He sanctifies us, he sets us apart and calls us to be saints, to live at holy lives devoted to the Lord.

Then the fourth word that Paul uses is redemption. In Christ Jesus we have redemption. This word for redemption refers to the release or the freedom, the liberation of slaves or captives. The great redemption of the Old Testament was when God redeemed his people Israel out of the land of Egypt where they were slaves. In the New Testament the great redemption we have is in Christ Jesus who liberated us from our bondage to sin, death, and the devil. Christ is wisdom from God, he is righteousness, he’s sanctification, he’s redemption.

But the question is, “well why does God call us in this way?” In verse twenty-nine Paul had told us that God chose those whom he called so that no human being could boast in the presence of God. Now Paul says something different but similar in verse thirty-one. He says here’s the new purpose as it is written, “let the one who boasts boast in the Lord.”

So, in the previous section our application was do not boast in yourself. But in this section the application is boast in Christ. Take confidence and trust in Christ. A few weeks ago, at the end of December, I asked you at the end of the year what your plan would be for going further up and further in Christ. To know him better, to appreciate his wisdom and the glory of the righteousness and sanctification and redemption that he provides for us in Christ.

Part of my application that I mentioned a little bit ago was to read John Owen’s “The Person of Christ.” The next week I went on vacation and I spent a lot of time reading that book and it’s so encouraging to think about who Jesus Christ is. Those old Puritans were so good at showing us with fresh eyes the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. If you’re reading a good book you know one of the things good books do is lead us deeper into the Scripture. It leads us to pray with fresh joy, with fresh burdens.

In fact, anything that we do, anything that we might have planned to go further up and further in to know Jesus Christ better, is always going to require prayerful biblical worship. Whether in private personally or in our family’s or a corporate worship. So perhaps as you’re studying the scriptures or are reading a good book, let me ask you to think about a few questions that you might prayerfully consider.

  1. What does this reveal about how I am depending human wisdom or human power rather than Christ? In other words what is this helping me to understand about where I’m taking confidence or a trust to get something other than Jesus Christ.
  2. What does this reveal about Christ as my wisdom, my righteousness, my sanctification, my redemption, or maybe something else. In other words, why is Christ worthy of my confidence and trust?
  3. What does this reveal about who I am in Christ and tell me about the glories of my union and communion and fellowship with Jesus Christ?
  4. What does this reveal about how I relate to others who are in Christ? You know when we looked at that passage in 1 Corinthians 1:10 we talked about divisions in the church. We talked about how we just gravitate naturally towards one group while gravitating away from another group that is not like us. They’re not the same age is us, the same family status, they don’t have same politics as we do, they’re not the same race as we are, they don’t have all the theological distinctives that we do.Overtime those divisions bring about distance and from a distance we start to hold others who are in Christ as well with suspicion. What’s going on over there? Then that suspicions eventually leads to distrust, I just don’t trust them. Until eventually that distrust moves to a complete schism in the body of Christ. A complete separation, complete split.

    The other thing you might ask is how might I be not separate for my brothers and sisters in Christ, but how might I serve them? How might I serve people generously with my time and my talents and my treasures?

  5. The fifth question is, what does this reveal about how I relate to others who are not yet in Christ? Perhaps I’m undervaluing or overvaluing certain people not because they’re my brother and sister in Christ, but because of the way that the world has evaluated those people. Do I recognize that they are in poverty outside of Christ? How might I grow in compassion then for those whom the world despises then to go to them with the gospel.

Those are just a few questions that through fully searching the scriptures we might grow in boasting in the person of Christ. But let’s think a little bit more about that last question that I brought up. How might we learn to relate better to others who are not yet in Christ? In other words, how might we spread the message of Jesus Christ to those who don’t yet know him.

Again, earlier I talked about this compared to this idea to that as a business starting up. Should we tweak the message? Paul says absolutely not. Should we adjust the method? Paul is also going to say absolutely not. But if this is the case, how then will anyone come to believe in the Lord Jesus Christ for salvation?

Our Preaching by the Power of the Holy Spirit

This brings us to our third point. That our preaching is by the power of the Holy Spirit. So, we have seen, first our calling is the people of God, second our boast is in the person of Christ and then finally our preaching is by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Look what Paul says in 2:1

And I, when I came to you, brothers, did not come proclaiming to you the testimony of God with lofty speech or wisdom. 1 Corinthians 2:1, ESV

So how did the apostle Paul bring the testimony of God? Not with lofty speech, in other words that’s the method, he’s not making use of the eloquent, wise sounding language. Nor is he using human wisdom, ways of convincing people according to logic and structures and thinking of this world. Paul says I’m not going to make use of those. Rather he tells us his messages in verse two.

2 For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified 1 Corinthians 2:2, ESV

That’s his message. According to worldly standards that’s a lemon of a message. Why on earth would anyone consider the execution victim of a Roman crucifixion to be the power of God unto salvation? Why should we know nothing except that some man 2000 years ago was put to death by Roman torturous crucifixion? Paul says that’s the only message we have, and we dare not mess with it.

The method then Paul says in verse three isn’t much more impressive.

3 And I was with you in weakness and in fear and much trembling, 4 and my speech and my message were not in plausible words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, 1 Corinthians 2:3-4, ESV

If you were listening to someone speak like that, maybe you’ve heard someone give a public speech and they’re just terrified, have you ever been convinced by someone like that? Why then would people be convinced from Paul preaches in this way?

In other words, Paul says that Christianity offers the least attractive message and the least attractive method of speaking. There’s nothing, humanly speaking, attractive about Christianity. There’s nothing, in other words, about Paul that brought the Corinthian church to faith. So, what then? How did anyone ever believe this?

Paul gets to this at the end of verse four.

4b but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, 5 so that your faith might not rest in the wisdom of men but in the power of God.1 Corinthians 2:4-5, ESV

It wasn’t by tweaking the message it, wasn’t by tweaking the method of preaching. He says but rather he trusted in demonstration of the Spirit unto power. This word for demonstration is a word that refers to something like the idea of clinching the argument. You know if you’re really good speaker, there comes a point when your language just perfectly wraps up your argument in a tight bow. It just absolutely bringing people to persuasion.

He didn’t do that by his own eloquent speech, but rather he trusted the clenching arguments to the Spirit. That is the power of the Spirit. This is where we read the idea of that effectual calling, Paul talked about that in verse twenty-six, “consider your calling”. We said that was the effectual calling, the proving of the beauty and the goodness and truth of Christianity, by opening our eyes to see it, by opening our ears to hear it, by open our hearts to receive it. This happens by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Paul is talking about what exactly the effectual calling looks like. Then he tells us in verse five again the purpose.

5 so that your faith might not rest in the wisdom of men but in the power of God.1 Corinthians 2:5, ESV

In other words, that you might not boast in the presence of God, but rather in the power of God. In other words, so that let the one that boasts boast in the power of God. Paul wants all of these people to not rest in what an effective speaker he is, or what wisdom he has, he just wants to hold up Jesus Christ and him crucified. The crazy thing is that the people believe this. Yet it’s not because of how good speaker Paul is. It is entirely to the glory of God the Father, who is the origin and the initiator of this, the Son who is the crucified for us, and the Holy Spirit who clenches the arguments in our hearts and minds so that we believe the Lord.

God’s grand purpose in all of this then is that God would be glorified in the wisdom of Christ crucified. That’s the message. And in the weakness of preaching, when the power of the Holy Spirit shines through, that’s the method. We’re not relying on us; we’re relying on the Holy Spirit.

Application

So, what does it mean for application? This means that we must depend on the Holy Spirit to boast in Christ to other people. You see we talked about this little bit last week, that you are called to boast in Christ. That is to proclaim him to others. Boasting in Christ is not just a function of a preacher preaching formally from the pulpit Sunday morning.

Rather boasting in Christ has to do with telling people about Jesus. Again, if you’re frightened, if you feel weak, if you feel like you’re trembling, if you feel like you’re tripping up on your words, that’s okay. So did Paul. It isn’t so much about how when some winsomely and effectively you can communicate this, you’re not depending upon that. You are depending upon the power of the Holy Spirit to clinch the argument in the minds of your friends, and your relatives, and those that you work with, and your classmates, and your professors, and your teachers, and your neighbors.

Now part of this campaign that we are in right now, Building on a Firm Foundation, I want to tell you a little bit about how we might apply this. Again, in this campaign we’re not just talking about raising money to improve our building, to build up the foundation of our facility for ministry, although that’s important. Our goals are not just financial, they are also spiritual.

The next big phase of the campaign, where we want to go from here, the whole reason for investing in this building is to expand what we are able to do in our ministry and mission especially renewed outreach.

Over the next year we want to start two ministries. One has happened in the past, but we want to bring it out again. One hasn’t really happened much in the past, but we want we want to launch it. We want to bring back an ESL Ministry, to reach out to internationals around us. Nearly one in every four homes within a mile of Harvest speaks a language other than English. We want to reach out to those people with the Gospel of Jesus Christ. More than that we are also located within 2.5 miles of three major universities and we want to reach college students with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

So, let me apply this by asking you what’s your part going to be in reaching people with the Gospel of Jesus Christ? We don’t have all the same gifts; we’re not called all to the same offices. How will you be involved in preaching and proclaiming Jesus Christ and him crucified? You don’t have to be a super preacher, you don’t have to have all the answers, you don’t have to be the most eloquent speaker. If you love Jesus and are willing to step out in faith to simply tell people that the Son of God took on human flesh and died for them so that they could be saved, that’s the main requirement.

If you’re willing to help in one of these ways or you have another way of reaching out that you want to help reach out to people to let them know about Jesus Christ, please let us know. We are looking for people who can help in these two efforts, but in other ways as well. Please be praying about how God would lead you to serve in your community and in Harvest and the surrounding community around Harvest. Beyond that let’s all be praying that God will pour out his Holy Spirit to bring fruit, to bring people to come to know the Lord Jesus Christ through faith and be saved.

Let’s pray. Heavenly Father, we pray that you would give us eyes to see and ears to hear and hearts to believe all that you have held out for us in Christ Jesus. Father, without the work of your Holy Spirit we are blind to it or deaf to it, our hearts are hard to it. So, we pray first that you would save us. Lead us deeper into Christ. But we also pray that you would make us faithful Father, to preach and to proclaim and share the good news of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to those that you have a put us into contact with.

We pray Father that you would continue to use our own individual relationships in ministry of Harvest Community Church to spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ by simply preaching and proclaiming Jesus Christ and him crucified, as we leave the demonstration and the argument to the Holy Spirit’s power. We pray this in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ and for his glory. Amen.

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